TrưỜng đẠi học khoa học tự nhiên chưƠng trình đÀo tạo trình đỘ ĐẠi học ngàNH: sinh họC ĐẠt chuẩn quốc tế Mà SỐ: 52420101 Hà Nội, 2012


S.Melmed, K.S.Polonsky, P.R.Larsen, H.M.Kronenberg. Williams Textbook of Endocrinology. 2011.12e. Elsevier Saunders



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S.Melmed, K.S.Polonsky, P.R.Larsen, H.M.Kronenberg. Williams Textbook of Endocrinology. 2011.12e. Elsevier Saunders


  1. Description: Fundamental concepts in endocrinology: endocrine (in comparison with exocrine), endocrine/hormonal control (in comparison with neural control). Endocrine, paracrine, autocrine signaling. Hormone, biosynthesis and secretion of hormones, mechanisms of hormonal action. Human endocrine glands and hormones. Endocrine disorders.

  2. Module/course outline

Chapter I. Endocrine System- the chemical intercellular communication system

1.1 Endocrine system- the chemical intercellular communication system

1.1.1 Endocrine control in comparison with neural control

1.1.2 Components of a cellular signal transduction pathway

1.2 Modes of cell signaling

1.2.1 Endocrine signaling

1.2.2 Autocrine signaling

1.2.3 Paracrine signaling

1.2.4 Pheromonal signaling

1.3 Hormone

1.3.1Definition of hormone

1.3.2 Molecular structure of hormones

1.3.2.1 Protein and peptide hormones

1.3.2.2 Amino acid derivative hormones

1.3.2.3 Lipid hormones

1.4 Biosynthesis of hormones

1.4.1 Biosynthesis of protein and peptide hormones

1.4.2 Biosynthesis of tyrosine derivative hormones

1.4.3 Biosynthesis of steroid hormones

1.5 Control of hormonal secretion

1.5.1 Neuronal control

1.5.2 Control by other hormones



1.5.3 Control by plasma concentrations of specific substances

  1. Hormone transport and delivery

  2. Hormone clearance

  3. Measurement of hormones

Chapter II: Mechanisms of hormone action

2.1 Hormone actions at 3 levels : molecular level, cellular level, and whole body level

2.1.1 Molecular level

- gene transcription

- protein synthesis and degradation

- enzyme activities

- protein interactions

2.1.2 cellular level

- cell division

- differentiation

- cell death

- motility

- secretion

- nutrient uptake

2.1.3 whole body level

- reproduction

- growth and development

- energy balance

- coping with environment

2.2 Hormone acts on target cells via binding to its specific receptors

2.3 Mechanism of action of hormones that acts at receptors on cell surface

2.3.1 Ligand-gated ion channels



2.3.2 G-protein coupled receptor

2.3.2.1 Structure of G-protein coupled receptor

2.3.2.2 cAMP-protein kinase A signal transduction pathway and the second messenger systems

2.3.2.3 DAG-PKC and IP3-Calmodulin signal transduction pathway

2.3.2 Tyrosine kinase-associated receptor and Jak-STAT signal transduction pathway

2.4 Mechanism of action of hormones that act on nuclear receptors

2.4.1 Structure of intracellular receptor

2.4.2 Intracellular receptors as ligand-regulated transcription factor

Chapter III: human endocrine system

3.1 Control of hormone secretion by the 4 level system: central nervous system, hypothalamus, pituitary, target glands

3.2 Human endocrine glands

3.2.1 Hypothalamus as a neuroendocrine gland

3.2.1.1 releasing hormones

3.2.1.2 inhibiting hormones

3.2.2 Pituitary and trophic hormones

3.2.2.1 trophic hormones from anterior pituitary

3.2.2.2 posterior pituitary hormones

3.2.3 Thyroid and parathyroid glands

3.2.3.1 Biosynthesis of thyroid hormones T3 and Thyroxin (T4)

3.2.3.2 Calcitonin acts as a regulator for blood calcium and phosphate

3.2.4 Adrenal gland and steroid hormones

3.2.4.1 structure of adrenal gland: adrenal cortex and adrenal medulla

3.2.4.2 steroid hormones of the adrenal cortex

3.2.4.3 tyrosine derivative neurohormones from adrenal medulla

3.2.5 Pancreas gland, insulin and glucagon

3.2.5.1 different cell types produce different hormones in the islets of Langerhans

3.2.5.2 insulin and glucagon as regulators for carbohydrate and fat metabolism

3.2.6 Reproductive glands and sex hormones

3.2.6.1 ovary (corpus luteum) and estrogene

3.2.6.2 yellow body and progesterone

3.2.6.3 testis and testosterone

3.2.7 Pineal gland



Chapter IV. Endocrine disorders

4.1 Hyposecretion of endocrine glands



4.2 Hypersecretion of endocrine glands

4.3 Hyporesponsiveness of target cells to hormones

4.4 Hyperesponsiveness of target cells to hormones

4.5 Insulin and diabetics

4.5.1 insulin receptor and mechanism of insulin action

4.5.2 insulin and carbohydrate metabolism

4.5.2 insulin and fat metabolism

4.5.3. Diabetes Mellitus and current therapies

4.5.3.1 Diabetes Mellitus type 1

4.5.3.2 Diabetes Mellitus type 2

4.6 Other endocrine disorders

66. Comparative Vertebrate Physiology

  1. Course number:BIO3421

  2. Credits: 3

  3. Prerequisites: Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Human and Animal Physiology

  4. Teaching language: English

  5. Instructors:

- MSc. Pham Trong Kha, Department of Anthropology - Physiology, Faculty of Biology, HUS

- MSc. Luu Thi Thu Phuong, Department of Anthropology - Physiology, Faculty of Biology, HUS

- Dr. To Thanh Thuy, Department of Anthropology - Physiology, Faculty of Biology, HUS


  1. Course objectives:

    1. Knowledge:

  • Understandthe evolution of vertebrates and the homeostatic principles amongst animals in the various classes of vertebrates

- Students canmaster theknowledges ofliving processestaking place invertebrateanimals. They canclarify thephysiologicaldifferencesbetweenvertebrateanimalsand with itan adaptation toliving environments.

  • Skills – attitude:

- Having organizational skills to arrange work
- Able to analyze problems
- Able to gather materials and synthesize information

- Good presentation Skills


- Communicating well in English
- Confident, active and flexible

  1. Assignment and testing

    Performance

    Proportion (%)

    Exercises and seminars/week or month

    20

    Middle examination

    20

    Final examination

    60

  2. Required textbooks

  • Hill, Wyse, Anderson. Animal Physiology, 2nd edition, Sinauer Associatees, Inc. USA, 2008.

  • Pat Willmer, Graham Stone, Ian Johnston. Environmental Physiology of Animals. 2nd edition, Blackwell Science Ltd, 2005.

  • Meyes and Schute. Principles of Animal Physiology, 2nd edition, Benjamin Cummings, USA, 2008.

  1. Course overview

A comparative study of vertebrate function. Physiology of selected systems, including digestion, circulation, excretion, respiration, and temperature regulation. Emphasis on physiological adaptations to the environment.

10. Detailed course description

Chapter 1. Introduction to comparative physiology

    1. Recall some basic concepts of physiology

    2. Central issues in comparative physiology

    3. Evolution of vertebrates

      1. Animals and Environments

      2. How do modern – day animals carry out their functions?

Chapter 2. Energy metabolism and metabolic rate

2.1. Concept of catabolic and anabolic processes

2.2. The forms of energy vary in capacity for physiology work

2.3. Efficiency of energy transformation

2.4. Metabolic rate in vertebrates

2.4.1. Basal metabolic rate and Standard metabolic rate

2.4.1. The relationship between metabolic rate and body size

2.5. Energetics of food and growth

2.6. Aerobic and anaerobic forms of metabolism

2.7. The energetics of aerobic activity



Chapter 3. Temperature regulation

3.1. The basic concepts

3.2. Temperature Regulation-Ectotherms

3.3. Temperature Regulation-Endotherms

3.4. Heat transfer between animals and their environments.

3.4.1. Hemothermy in mammals and birds

3.4.2. Warm – bodied fish

3.4.3. Endothermy and hemothermy in insects



Chapter 4. The physiology of breathing by vertebrates

4.1. The contrasting physical properties of air and water

4.2. Diffusion of gases

4.3. The basic concepts of external respiration

4.4. Breathing by fish

4.5. Breathing by Amphibians

4.6. Breathing by reptiles

4.7. Breathing by birds and mammals

4.8. Regulation of respiration: acid – base balance

Chapter 5. Circulation

5.1. Evolution of cardiovascular system in vertebrates

5.2. Circulation in fish

5.3. Circulation in amphibians and reptiles

5.4. Circulation in birds and mammals

5.5. Oxygen, Carbon dioxide, and internal transport at work: diving by marine mammals

5.5.1. Circulation adjustments during dives

5.5.2. Metabolism during dives



Chapter 6. Water and salt physiology: Introduction and mechanism

6.1. The importance of animal body fluids

6.2. The relationships among body fluids

6.3. The evolution of urea synthesis in vertebrates

6.4. Renal physiology in Aquatic Vertebrates and Terrestrial Vertebrates

6.5. Water and salt physiology of animals in their environments

6.5.1. Animals in freshwater

6.5.1. Animals in ocean

6.5.2. Mammals of deserts and dry savannas

67. Neurobiology


  1. Course number: BIO3422

  2. Credits: 3

  3. Prerequisites: Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Human and Animal Physiology.

  4. Teaching language: English

  5. Instructors:

- MSc. Pham Trong Kha, Department of Anthropology - Physiology, Faculty of Biology, HUS

- MSc. Luu Thi Thu Phuong, Department of Anthropology - Physiology, Faculty of Biology, HUS

- Dr. To Thanh Thuy, Department of Anthropology - Physiology, Faculty of Biology, HUS


  1. Course objectives:

    1. Knowledge:

  • Understandingwhat theneurobiology is, classification of nervous cells, how to recognize aneuron.

  • Students canmaster theknowledges of the basic principles of neurobiology from neuron to brain. Clarifying the nature ofnerve impulses andthetransmissionof nerve impulses. Understanding thechemical signalsand electrical signals. Describe of Neurotransmitters and Neurohormone, Thecurrent understandingofmolecular mechanismsof learning, memory etc. and thedevelopmentofneurosciencein the future

  • Understandseveral methods ofresearch inneurobiologyandtheirapplications.

    1. Skills – attitude:

- Having organizational skills to arrange work
- Able to analyze problems
- Able to gather materials and synthesize information

- Good presentation Skills


- Communicating well in English
- Confident, active and flexible

  1. Assignment and testing

    Performance

    Proportion (%)

    Exercises and seminars/week or month

    20

    Middle examination

    20

    Final examination

    60

  2. Required textbooks

  • Dale Purves, George J. Augustine, David Fitzpatrick, William C. Hall, Anthony-Samuel LaMantia, and Leonard E. White (2012), Neuroscience, Fifth Edition, Sinauer Associatees, Inc. USA.

  • Nicholls, J.G., Martin, A.R and Wallace B.G (2001), From Neuron to Brain, 4th edition, Sinauer Associatees, Inc. USA.

  • Guyton and Hall Textbook of Medical Physiology (2010), 12th edition, Sinauer Associatees, Inc. USA.

  1. Course overview

This course will provide an introduction to basic principles of neurobiology from neuron to brain, including the common functions of nervuos system, early brain development, functional and structural unit of nervous system, the nature of nervous pulse, transportation of electrial and chemical signals of nerve cells, neurotransmitters and their receptors, complex brain functions, problems and perspectives of neurobiology in the future.

10. Detailed course description

Chapter 1. Introduction to nervous system in human and animals

    1. Phytogense development of nervous system

    2. Organizational principles of nervous system

    3. Functional analysis of nervous system, relationship between nervous system and endocrine in regulation of the body

Chapter 2. Early Brain Development

2.1. Ectodermal cells and formation of the neural plate

2.2. Formation of the main structures of nervous system

2.3. Differentiation ofnervecells

2.4. POUand Homeoboxgeneswiththeearly developmentof the brain
2.5.The process ofmyelination
2.6.Therecent researchonthe formationand development of theaxonandsynap

Chapter 3. The cellular components of the nervous system

3.1. Cellular diversity in the nervous system

3.2. Neurons

3.3. Neuroglia

3.4. Neuroregeneration

3.5. Gap junction

3.6. Glia cells and blood brain barrier

3.7. Synap



Chapter 4. Electrical signals of nerve cells

4.1. Localization of ion channels in neurons

4.2. The ionic basis of resting membrane potential and action potential

4.3. Patch Clamp Method

4.4. Molecular mechanism of nerve impulse transmission.

Chapter 5. Neurotransmitters and Neurohormones

5.1. Overveiw

5.1.1. Synthesis of proteins in nerve body

5.1.2. Transport of synthesized proteins in axon

5.1.3. Secretion of neurotransmitters and neurohormones

5.1.4. Exocytosis and Endocytosis

5.2. Categories of neurotransmitters

5.2.1. Excitatory neurotransmitters

5.2.2. Inhibitory neurotransmitters

Chapter 6. Signal Propagation between the cells

6.1. Signal transduction mechanism through G protein

6.2. Signal transduction mechanism through ion channel – linked receptors

Chapter 7. Higher mental functions

7.1. Concepts

7.2. The first and second signal system

7.3. Learning and memory

7.4. Sleep

Chapter 8. Some mental diseases

8.1. Parkinson

8.2. Alzheimer

8.3. Huntington



Chapter 9. Some current research on the neurobiology
9.1. Molecular Neurobiology
9.2. Immunology Neuroscience
9.3. Behavioral neurobiology
9.4. Pathoneurobiology and aging

68. Experiments in Plant Physiology

  1. Course number: BIO3423

  2. Credit: 3

  3. Prerequisites: Plant physiology

  4. Teaching language: English and Vietnamese

  5. Instructors: (Full name, academic title and degree, academic units and faculties)

- Full name: Pham Thi Luong Hang

  • Academic degree: Doctor

  • Unit: Department of plant physiology and Biochemistry, Faculty of Biology

- Email: luonghang@gmail.com

2) Full name: Le Quynh Mai



  • Academic degree: Doctor

  • Unit: Department of plant physiology and Biochemistry, Faculty of Biology

  • Email: lequynhmai80@gmail.com

3) Full name: Tran Thi Du Chi

  • Academic degree: Master

  • Unit: Department of plant physiology and Biochemistry, Faculty of Biology

  • email: tranduchi@gmail.com

  1. Course objectives: (knowledge, skills, attitude)

    1. Knowledge:

- Able to explain the results of the osmotic pressure of plant cells, photosynthesis intensity and efficiency of transpiration process.

- Observe clearly the plasmolsed cell and turgid cell isolated from pupple epidermis onion.

- Able to separate photosynthetic pigments on thin layer chromatography based on polarization of pigment and solvent

- Proof the photosynthetic capacity of isolated chloroplasts

- Proof the presence of minerals in the ash plant


    1. Skills – attitude:

- Having organizational skills to arrange work
- Able to analyze problems
- Able to gather materials and synthesize information

- Good presentation Skills


- Communicating well in English
- Confident, active and flexible

  1. Assignment and testing

Performance Proportion (%)

Report/month 20

Middle examination 20

Final examination 60



  1. Required textbooks (authors, textbook name, publisher, year of publication)

  1. Vu Van Vu and et al., Experiments in Plant Physiology, Hanoi univertsity of Science Publisher

  2. Scott Freeman, Biological Science, 4th edition, 2010, Pearson Education Inc. Publishing

  3. Campbell & Reece, Biology, 6th Edition, 2002, Pearson Education Inc. Publishing

  1. Course overview (approximately 120 words)

Observating absorption of water by plant cell, transpiration of leaves and also water transport in vasticular tissue. Analysis of chlorophyll content and CO2 uptake/O2 release rate are established for further understanding about photosynthesis.

  1. Detailed course description (discribed in chapters, main topics, subtopics, topics)

Chapter 1: Plant cells
Lab 1: The penetration of substances into plant cells
Lab 2: Observe the plasmolsed cell and turgid cell isolated from pupple epidermis onion.

Lab 3: Permeability of internal compounds of cytosol in living cells and dead cells.



Chapter 2: Water absorption of plant cells
Lab 4: Determination of osmotic pressure of plant cells based on plasmolysis method.
Lab 5: Determination of osmotic pressure of plant cells based on comparing the proportion of solutions

Lab 6: Determination of water absorption by plant cells according to the change of solution concentration.


Lab 7: Determination of water absorption by plant cells based method Usprung
Chapter 3: The absorption and transport of water in plant
Lab 8: The transport of water and solute substance in isolated branches
Lab 9: Determination of transpiration intensity by means of fast weight
Lab 10: Observation of the stomata opening and closing under the microscope
Chapter 4: Mineral nutrition in plants
Lab 11: Analysis of minerals in plants
Lab 12: Determination of NO-3 ions in plants
Chapter 5: Photosynthesis
Lab 13: Physical and chemical reactions and photosensitive properties of chlorophyll
Lab 14: Separation of pigments by thin layer chromatography
Lab 15: Separation and quantification of yellow pigments
Lab 16: Determination of chlorophyll a and b content in leaves of C3/C4 plants
Lab 17: Determination of photochemical activity of isolated chloroplasts

Lab 18: The release of oxygen in aquatic plants under light condition


Lab 19: Determination of photosynthetic intensity based on Tiurin method
Chapter 6: Cell respiration
Lab 20: Detection of the respiratory enzyme
Chapter 7: Growth and development
Lab 21: Effect of gibberellin in germination of seeds
Lab 22: Determination of photoropism of plant

69. Experiments in Animal Physiology

  1. Course number: BIO3424

  2. Credit: 3

  3. Prerequisites: BIO2405 (Animal physiology)

  4. Teaching language: English or Vietnamese

  5. Instructors: (Full name, academic title and degree, academic units and faculties)

- Full name: Luu Thi Thu Phuong

  • Academic degree: Master

  • Unit: Department of Anthropology - Physiology, Faculty of Biology

- Email: luuthuphuongsinhhoc@gmail.com

2) Full name: Pham Trong Kha



  • Academic degree: Master

  • Unit: Department of Anthropology - Physiology, Faculty of Biology

  • Email: phamtrongkha@yahoo.com

3) Full name: To Thanh Thuy

  • Academic degree: Doctor

  • Unit: Department of Anthropology - Physiology, Faculty of Biology

  1. Course objectives: (knowledge, skills, attitude)

    1. Knowledge:

  • Perform fluently some techniques in the laboratory to determine some physiological indexes such as hemoglobin concentration, heart rate, vital capacity, blood pressure…

  • Making some experimental models such as insulin shock, formation of conditional reflects

  • Redo some famous experiments in physiology such as Stanius experiment, Sechonov inhibiting…

  • Skills – attitude:

- Having organizational skills to arrange work
- Able to analyze problems
- Able to gather materials and synthesize information

- Good presentation Skills


- Communicating well in English
- Confident, active and flexible

  1. Assignment and testing

Performance Proportion (%)

Assignment/week 10

Report/month 10

Middle examination 20

Final examination 60


  1. Required textbooks (authors, textbook name, publisher, year of publication)

1.Trinh Huu Hang, Do Cong Huynh (2000), “Experiments in Animal Physiology”, Technique and Science publisher, Ha Noi

  1. Course overview (approximately 120 words)

"Experiments in animal physiology" course provides students with the practical skills in the field of Physiology in the Laboratory. Students will be provided with the basic method to determine the physiological important indexes in the body. The learners were also conducted experiments on animals to prove the basic principles of Physiology. Besides, this course shows classic experiments that help students develop their creative abilities in the study modern Physiology. In addition, this subject provides students with ability on building an experimental model. Moreover, their creativities are shown by establishing a process of formation conditioned reflexes in animals based on the model of Pavlov.

  1. Detailed course description (discribed in chapters, main topics, subtopics, topics)

Chapter 1. Overview of the Experiments in Animal Physiology

    1. The role of this subject

    2. Animals in experiments

    3. Machines and chemical solutions

    4. fundamental techniques

Chapter 2. Cardiovascular system

2.1. Determine blood groups

2.2. Determine the concentration of hemoglobin

2.3. Heart sounds

2.4. Heart anatomy and heart rate

2.5. Electrocardiogram

2.6. Measure the blood pressure indirectly

2.7. Regulation of heart activities by nervous system

2.8. Stanius experiment

2.9. Claude-Bernard experiment

Chapter 3. Respiratory system

3.1. Measure the vital capacity and expiratory peak flow

Chapter 4. Endocrine system

4.1. Cut the pituitary gland

4.2. Determine the blood glucose

4.3. Making insulin shock

4.4. diagnosis of early pregnancy

Chapter 5. Nervous and muscle systems

5.1. Measure the muscle force

5.2. Analyse reflect arc

5.3. Sechenov inhibiting

5.4. Formation of conditional reflects

Chapter 6. Sensory system

6.1. Determine the vision

6.2. Determine taste zones on the tongue

71. Plants and Humanity

1. Course number: BIO3426

2. Credit: 3

3. Prerequisites: Botany

4. Teaching language: English/Vietnamese

5. Instructors:

- Assoc.Prof. Dr. Nguyen Trung Thanh

Department of Botany, Faculty of Biology, VNU University of Science

- Dr. Nguyen Thuy Lien

Department of Botany, Faculty of Biology, VNU University of Science

- MSc. Nguyen Thi Kim Thanh

Department of Botany, Faculty of Biology, VNU University of Science.

6. Course objectives: (knowledge, skills, attitude)

- Knowledge objectives: The course provides students the knowledge about the diversity of living things; Demonstrate ways to measure environmental services accomplished by plants. Explain and provide examples of the principle of compensatory growth shown by plants growing in the world’s extreme environments. Evaluate and demonstrate scientific (measurable) evidence, including interpretation of images. Compose their own images, in constructing scientific argument.

- Skill objectives: The course helps students to acquire a basic knowledge of common plant species, economically valuable species and endangered species, avoid accidental poisoning from wild mushrooms. Install and manage a productive food garden in countries ranging in the world (temperate, tropical, and arid zones).

7. Assignment and testing

Mid-term Test:

Time: after the 7th week.

Test form: multiple choice or essay.

Ratio: 20%

Final test:

Time: after the 14th week.

Test form: multiple choice, essay or oral examination.

Ratio: 50%

Regular test:

By laboratory work.

8. Required textbooks (authors, textbook name, publisher, year of publication)

- James D. Mauseth, Botany introduction to Plant Biology, Fourth edition, Jones and Bartlett Publishers, 2009.

- Walter S. Judd, Christopher S. Campbell, Elizabeth A. Kellogg, Peter F. Stevens, Michael J. Donoghue, Plant Systematics a Phylogenetic Approach, Third edition, Publishers-Sunderland, Massachusetts USA, 2007.

Other resourses:

- Dennis W. Woodland, Contemporary Plant Systematics, Fourth Edition, Printed in the United States of America, 2009.

- Peter H. Raven, Ray F. Evert, Susan E. Eichhorn. Biology of Plant, 7th Edition. Printed in the United States of America, 2004.

- Nguyễn Bá, Giáo trình Thực vật học, Nxb Giáo dục, 2007.

- Nguyễn Bá, Hình thái học thực vật, Nxb Giáo dục, 2007.

- Nguyễn Nghĩa Thìn, Đặng Thị Sy, Hệ thống học thực vật, Nxb ĐHQG Hà Nội, 2004.



9. Course overview:

Structure, activities, human and ecological significance of plants, including an overview of plant diversity. Emphasis placed on global aspects of this dynamic science, with selected topics on acid rain, deforestation, biotechnology, and other applications. Also covered are medicinal, poisonous, and nutritional sources from seaweeds and mushrooms to mangos and durians.



10. Detailed course description (discribed in chapters, main topics, subtopics, topics)

1. Introduction

2. Plants and green economics: environmental services

3. Essentials of plant architecture

4. Hierarchy of classification; leaves

5. Leaves

6. Carnivorous bog species

7. Epiphytes; out on a limb

8. Root organization

9. Mangroves: coastal fortresses

10. Stem variations

11. Wood; tissue for the ages

12. Cell organization; the wall

13. Cell protoplasm

14. Products of the cell; carbon offsets

15. Genetic engineering and biotechnology

16. Soil structure, acid rain, marketable permits

17. Mineral nutrition N-P-K

18. Transpirational fate of rainwater

19. Hormones and flowering

20. Fruit development and ripening

21. Environmental repair strategies

22. Evolutionary relationships

23. Green algae and water quality

24. Seaweeds

25. Seaweeds; it’s a wrap

26. Molds

27. Yeasts; pigs in heaven

28. Mushrooms

29. Lichens

30. Mosses

31. Ferns; with fronds like these...

32. Conifers; the efficiency of seeds

33. International forestry: traditional vs. sustainable



72. Evolutionary Ecology

  1. Course number: BIO3427

  2. Credit: 3

  3. Prerequisites: BIO3401 (Organisms and Populations), BIO3406 (Ecology).

  4. Teaching language: English

  5. Instructors: (Full name, academic title and degree, academic units and faculties)

- Dr. Tran Anh Duc, Department of Invertebrate Zoology

- Assoc.Prof. Dr. Nguyen Van Vinh, Department of Invertebrate Zoology



  1. Course objectives: (knowledge, skills, attitude)

6.1. Knowledge:

- To learn & understand the importance and applications of evolutionary biology, impacts of evolutionary biology on the society.

- To learn & understand basic concepts of evolutionary biology: population genetics, speciations, natural selection, sexual selection, biogeography, co-evolution, molecular evolution.

- To learn & understand patterns and mechanisms of biological evolution.

- To learn, understand, and be able to explain the connection between evolution and biodiversity.

- To learn, understand, and be able to apply basic methods in phylogenetic research.

6.2. Personal skills and professional attitude

- To be able to acquire latest advancement of information technology in biological research.

- To be able to apply fundamental principles of phylogenetic study.

- Strengthen critical thinking ability.

- Honesty in scientific activities.

- Work discipline.

6.3 Social skills and attitude

- To understand fundamental importance of evolutionary biology in biological research and conservation of biology.

- To understand impacts of evolutionary biology to the society.

- To build and enhance the love for nature, environmental awareness.

6.4. Ability to apply knowledge in real life

- To be able to recognize, analyze, determine, and to solve problems in biological research, to explain evolution of organisms, phylogenetic relationships of organisms.



  1. Assignment and testing

- Continuous assessment based on exercise and group discussions during class time.

- Group essays (on selected topics of evolutionary biology) and presentations at the end of the course.



  1. Required textbooks (authors, textbook name, publisher, year of publication)

D.J. Futuyma. Evolution, 2nd edition. Sinauer Associates Inc., 2009.

E. Mayr. What evolution is. Basic Books, 2001.



K.V. Kardong. An Introduction to Biological Evolution, 2nd edition. McGraw-Hill, 2008.

  1. Course overview (approximately 120 words)

This course provides theory and evidence on mechanisms of evolutionary change in natural populations. Main topics inlude population genetics, speciation,natural selection, sexual selection, biogeography, coevolution, molecular evolution. Students will also learn up-to-date methodology in phylogenetic and evolutionary research via some case studies.

  1. Detailed course description (discribed in chapters, main topics, subtopics, topics)

Chapter 1. Evolutionary Biology

  • What Is Evolution?

  • Before Darwin

  • Charles Darwin

  • Darwin’s Evolutionary Theory

  • Evolutionary Theories after Darwin

  • The Evolutionary Synthesis

  • Philosophical Issues

  • Ethics, Religion, and Evolution

  • Evolution as Fact and Theory

Chapter 2. The Tree of Life: Classification and Phylogeny

  • Classification

  • Inferring Phylogenetic History

  • Molecular Clocks

  • Gene Trees

  • Difficulties in Phylogenetic Analysis

  • Hybridization and Horizontal Gene Transfer

Chapter 3. Patterns of Evolution

  • Evolutionary History and Classification

  • Inferring the History of Character Evolution

  • Some Patterns of Evolutionary Change Inferred from Systematics

  • Phylogenetic Analysis Documents Evolutionary Trends

  • Many Clades Display Adaptive Radiation

  • Patterns in Genes and Genomes

Chapter 4. Evolution in the Fossil Record

  • Some Geological Fundamentals

  • The Fossil Record

  • The Hominin Fossil Record

  • Phylogeny and the Fossil Record

  • Evolutionary Trends

  • Punctuated Equilibria

  • Rates of Evolution

Chapter 5. A History of Life on Earth

  • Before Life Began

  • The Emergence of Life

  • Precambrian Life

  • Paleozoic Life: The Cambrian Explosion

  • Paleozoic Life: Ordovician to Devonian

  • Paleozoic Life: Carboniferous and Permian

  • Mesozoic Life

  • The Cenozoic Era

Chapter 6. The Geography of Evolution

  • Biogeographic Evidence for Evolution

  • Major Patterns of Distribution

  • Historical Factors Affecting Geographic Distributions

  • Testing Hypotheses in Historical Biogeography

  • Phylogeography

  • Geographic Range Limits: Ecology and Evolution

  • Evolution of Geographic Patterns of Diversity

  • Effects of History on Contemporary Diversity Patterns

Chapter 7. The Evolution of Biodiversity

  • Estimating and Modeling Biological Diversity

  • Taxonomic Diversity through the Phanerozoic

  • Does Species Diversity Reach Equilibrium?

Chapter 8. The Origin of Genetic Variation

  • Genes and Genomes

  • Gene Mutations

  • Mutation as a Random Process

  • Alterations of the Karyotype

Chapter 9. Variation

  • Sources of Phenotypic Variation

  • Fundamental Principles of Genetic Variation in Populations

  • Genetic Variation in Natural Populations: Individual Genes

  • Genetic Variation in Natural Populations: Multiple Loci

  • Variation among Populations

Chapter 10. Genetic Drift: Evolution at Random

  • The Theory of Genetic Drift

  • Evolution by Genetic Drift

  • The Neutral Theory of Molecular Evolution

  • Gene Flow and Genetic Drift

Chapter 11. Natural Selection and Adaptation

  • Adaptations in Action: Some Examples

  • The Nature of Natural Selection

  • Examples of Natural Selection

  • Levels of Selection

  • The Nature of Adaptations

Chapter 12. The Genetical Theory of Natural Selection

  • Fitness

  • Models of Selection

  • Polymorphism Maintained by Balancing Selection

  • Multiple Outcomes of Evolutionary Change

  • The Strength of Natural Selection

  • Molecular Signatures of Natural Selection

Chapter 13. Phenotypic Evolution

  • Genetic Architecture of Phenotypic Traits

  • Components of Phenotypic Variation

  • Genetic Drift or Natural Selection?

  • Natural Selection on Quantitative Traits

  • What Maintains Genetic Variation in Quantitative Characters?

  • Correlated Evolution of Quantitative Traits

  • Can Genetics Predict Long-Term Evolution?

  • Norms of Reaction

  • Genetic Constraints on Evolution

Chapter 14. The Evolution of Life Histories

  • Individual Selection and Group Selection

  • Modeling Optimal Phenotypes

  • Life History Traits as Components of Fitness

  • Trade-Offs

  • The Evolution of the Rate of Increase

Chapter 15. Sex and Reproductive Success

  • The Evolution of Mutation Rates

  • Sexual and Asexual Reproduction

  • The Paradox of Sex

  • Sex Ratios and Sex Allocation

  • Inbreeding and Outcrossing

  • The Concept of Sexual Selection

  • Contests between Males and between Sperm

  • Sexual Selection by Mate Choice

  • Antagonistic Coevolution

  • Alternative Mating Strategies

Chapter 16. Conflict and Cooperation

  • Conflict

  • Social Interactions and Cooperation

  • A Genetic Battleground: The Family

  • Genetic Conflict

  • Parasitism, Mutualism, and Levels of Organization

  • Human Behavior and Human Societies

Chapter 17. Species

  • What Are Species?

  • Barriers to Gene Flow

  • How Species Are Diagnosed

  • Differences among Species

  • The Genetic Basis of Reproductive Barriers

  • Molecular Divergence among Species

  • Hybridization

Chapter 18. Speciation

  • Modes of Speciation

  • Allopatric Speciation

  • Alternatives to Allopatric Speciation

  • Polyploidy and Recombinational Speciation

  • How Fast Is Speciation?

  • Consequences of Speciation

Chapter 19. Coevolution: Evolving Interactions among Species

  • The Nature of Coevolution

  • Phylogenetic Aspects of Species Associations

  • Coevolution of Enemies and Victims

  • Mutualisms

  • The Evolution of Competitive Interactions

Chapter 20. Evolution of Genes and Genomes

  • Genome Diversity and Evolution

  • Protein Evolution and Translational Robustness

  • Natural Selection across the Genome

  • Origin of New Genes

Chapter 21. Evolution and Development

  • Hox Genes and the Dawn of Modern EDB

  • Types of Evidence in Contemporary EDB

  • The Evolving Concept of Homology

  • Evolutionarily Conserved Developmental Pathways

  • Gene Regulation: A Keystone of Developmental Evolution

  • Developmental Constraints and Morphological Evolution

  • The Molecular Genetic Basis of Gene Regulatory Evolution

  • Toward the EDB of Homo sapiens

Chapter 22. Macroevolution: Evolution above the Species Level

  • Rates of Evolution

  • Gradualism and Saltation

  • Phylogenetic Conservatism and Change

  • The Evolution of Novelty

  • Trends and Progress

Chapter 23. Evolutionary Science and Creationism

  • Creationists and Other Skeptics

  • Science, Belief, and Education

  • The Evidence for Evolution

  • Refuting Creationist Arguments

73. General Entomology

  1. Course number: BIO3428

  2. Credit: 3

  3. Prerequisites: Invertebrate (BIO3404)

  4. Teaching language: English

  5. Instructors: (Full name, academic title and degree, academic units and faculties)

  • Assoc. Prof. Dr. Nguyen Van Quang, Depart. of Invertebrate Zoology Faculty of Biology, Hanoi University of Science, VNU

  • Assoc. Prof. Dr. Nguyen VanVinh, Depart. of Invertebrate Zoology Faculty of Biology, Hanoi University of Science, VNU

  • Dr. Tran Anh Duc, Depart. of Invertebrate Zoology Faculty of Biology, Hanoi University of Science, VNU



  1. Course objectives: (knowledge, skills, attitude)

  • Knowledge

- Having fundamental knowledge of external morphological features, internal anatomy and functions of organs of insect body: muscles and locomotion, guts and digestion, circulatory system, respiratory, excretory, nervous systems, endo- and exocrine glands.

- Understanding reproductive features: the types of reproduction, embryonic and postembryonic development; understanding and explanation of the regulation processes and controls of insect development; differentiating the kinds of metamorphosis, life cycle, development phases, age-grading...

- Understanding and differentiating features and effects of ecological factors: klimate, weather, food, intra- and interspecific interactions.

- Cognizing taxonomical characteristics; identificating the orders of insects.

Understanding the important roles of insects to the environment and human life.


  • Personal and professional skills and attributes

- Practising experimental skills: preparing and observating specimens, dissecting

insect organism, identification of insects.

- Training the skills at collecting and analyzing the experimental results which are presented in the form of data or scientific drawings.

- Having the skills at self-learning and self-doing research, searching, collecting, analyzing and handling/processing the international entomological data, writing and presenting the scientific contents.

- Students are encouraged to develop holistically personal skills and attitudes such as: time and resource management, self-management, perseverance, responsibility, flexibility, self-confidence, diligence, enthusiasm and passion for career.


  • The social kills and attitude

- Students are required to build up interpersonal skills such at team-working (leading and operating a team and working in different teams); communicating by writing through e-mail and by making oral presentation.

  • Ability to apply the knowledge into practice

- Through the manner of group discussions, assignments and seminars, the students are able to conceive entomological ideas, design and implement of applying entomological knowleges into medical, agricultural areas and biodiversity conservation. These actions will help the students develop profesional and personal kills in future.

  1. Assignment and testing

Team assignments, oral presentation in class: 10%

Practice in the lab: 10%

Mid-term Exam: 20%

Final Exam: 60%



  1. Required textbooks (authors, textbook name, publisher, year of publication)

  1. Nguyễn Anh Diệp, Trương Quang Học, Phạm Bình Quyền. Côn trùng học. NXB ĐHQG Hà Nội, 2005.

  2. Phạm Bình Quyền. Sinh thái học côn trùng. NXB ĐHQG Hà Nội, 2005.

  3. Cedric G., Entomology, Plenum Pres, New York and London, 2005.

Học liệu tham khảo

  1. Borror J.D., An Introduction to the Study of Insects. Sixth Edition. Saunder College Publishing, 1989.

  2. Đặng Ngọc Thanh, Trương Quang Học (Chủ biên). Hướng dẫn thực tập

Động vật không xương sống. NXB Đại học Quốc gia Hà Nội, 1999.

  1. Mayr, E., Principles of Systematic Zoology, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1991

  2. Chapman, R.F.,The Insect Structure and Functions, Hodder and Stoughton, London Sydney Aukland Toronto, 1982.



  1. Course overview (approximately 120 words)

The origin of insects, the relations between insects and the other arthropod animal groups; the external morphological features, internal anatomy and funtions of organs of the insect body such as muscles and locomotion, digestive system, circulatory, respiratory, nervous and sensory, excretory, reproductive systems, endo- and exocrine glands; the structures and funtions of integument; Reproductive and development features; the types of reproduction, embryonic and postembryonic development; regulation processes and controls of insect development; the types of metamorphosis, life cycle, development phases, age-grading... the features and effects of ecological factors on insect life: klimate, weather, food, intra- and interspecific interactions. The taxonomical characteristics and identification of the orders of insects. The important roles of insects to the environment and human life.

  1. Detailed course description (described in chapters, main topics, subtopics, topics)

I. Introduction

Chapter 1. The evolutionary relationships between insects and the other arthropod groups

1. Introduction

2. Arthropod Diversity

2.1. Onychophora, Tardigrada, and Pentastoma

2.2. Trilobita

2.3. The Chelicerate Arthropods

2.4. The Mandibulate Arthropods

3. Evolutionary Relationships of Arthropods

3.1. The Problem

3.2. Theories of Arthropod Evolution

3.3. The Uniramians



II. External Anatomy

Chapter 2. External Structure

1. Introduction

2. General Body Plan

3. The Head

3.1. General Structure

3.2. Head Appendages

3.2.1. Antennae

3.2.2. Mouthparts

4. The Neck and Thorax

4.1. The Neck

4.2. Structure of the Thorax

4.3. Thoracic Appendages

4.3.1. Legs

4.3.2. Wings

5. The Abdomen

5.1. General Structure

5.2. Abdominal Appendages

5.2.1. External Genitalia

5.2.2. Other Appendages



II. Anatomy and Physiology

Chapter 3. The Integument

1. Introduction

2. Structure

3. Cuticle Formation

3.1. Preecdysis

3.2. Ecdysis

3.3. Postecdysis

3.4. Coordination of Events

4. Functions of the Integument

4.1. Strength and Hardness

4.2. Permeability

4.3. Color

4.4. Other Functions

Chapter 4. Sensory Systems

1. Introduction

2. Mechanoreception

2.1. Sensory Hairs

2.2. Proprioceptors

2.3. Signal Detection

3. Sound Reception

3.1. Johnston’s Organ

3.2. Tympanal Organs

3.3. Subgenual Organs

4. Chemoreception

4.1. Location and Structure of Sensilla

4.2. Physiology of Chemoreception

5. Humidity Perception

6. Temperature Perception

7. Photoreception

7.1. Compound Eyes

7.2. Simple Eyes

Chapter 5. Nervous and Chemical Integration

1. Introduction

2. Nervous System

2.1. Central Nervous System

2.2. Visceral Nervous System

2.3. Physiology of Neural Integration

2.4. Learning and Memory

3. Endocrine System

3.1. Neurosecretory Cells and Corpora Cardiaca

3.2. Corpora Allata

3.3. Molt Glands

3.4. Other Endocrine Structures

4. Insect Semiochemicals

4.1. Pheromones

4.2. Kairomones

4.3. Allomones

5. Environmental, Neural, and Endocrine Interaction

Chapter 6. Muscles and Locomotion

1. Introduction

2. Muscles

2.1. Structure

2.2. Physiology

3. Locomotion

3.1. Movement on or Through a Substrate

3.2. Movement on or Through Water

3.3. Flight

3.4. Orientation

Chapter 7. Respratory system

1. Introduction

2. Organization and Structure of the Tracheal System

2.1. Tracheae and Tracheoles

2.2. Spiracles

3. Movement of Gases within the Tracheal System

3.1. Diffusion

3.2. Discontinuous Gas Exchange

3.3. Active Ventilation

4. Gas Exchange in Aquatic Insects

4.1. Closed Tracheal Systems

4.2. Open Tracheal Systems

5. Gas Exchange in Endoparasitic Insects

Chapter 8. Food Uptake and Utilization

1. Introduction

2. Food Selection and Feeding

3. The Alimentary System

3.1. Salivary Glands

3.2. Foregut

3.3. Midgut

3.4. Hindgut

4. Gut Physiology

4.1. Gut Movements

4.2. Digestion

4.2.1. Digestive Enzymes

4.3. Absorption

5. Metabolism

5.1. Sites of Metabolism

5.2. Carbohydrate Metabolism

5.3. Lipid Metabolism

5.4. Amino Acid and Protein Metabolism

5.5. Metabolism of Insecticides

Chapter 9. The Circulatory System

1. Introduction

2. Structure

3. Physiology

3.1. Circulation

3.2. Heartbeat

4. Hemolymph

4.1. Plasma

4.2. Hemocytes

5.1. Wound Healing

5.2. Immunity

Chapter 10 Nitrogenous Excretion and Salt and Water Balance

1. Introduction

2. Excretory Systems

2.1. Malpighian Tubules—Rectum

2.2. Other Excretory Structures

3. Nitrogenous Excretion

3.1. The Nature of Nitrogenous Wastes

3.2. Physiology of Nitrogenous Excretion

3.3. Storage Excretion

4. Salt and Water Balance

4.1. Terrestrial Insects

4.2. Freshwater Insects

4.3. Brackish-Water and Saltwater Insects

5. Hormonal Control



III. Reproduction and Development

Chapter 11. Reproduction

1. Introduction

2. Structure and Function of the Reproductive System

2.1. Female

2.2. Male

3. Sexual Maturation

3.1. Female

3.2. Male

4. Mating Behavior

4.1. Mate Location and Recognition

4.2. Courtship

4.3. Copulation

4.4. Postcopulatory Behavior

5. Ovulation

6. Sperm Use, Entry into the Egg, and Fertilization

6.1. Sperm Use

6.2. Sperm Entry into the Eggs

6.3. Fertilization

7. Oviposition

7.1. Site Selection

7.2. Mechanics and Control of Oviposition

7.3. Oothecae

Chapter 12. Embryonic Development

1. Introduction

2. Cleavage and Blastoderm Formation

3. Formation and Growth of Germ Band

4. Gastrulation, Somite Formation, and Segmentation

5. Formation of Extra-Embryonic Membranes

6. Dorsal Closure and Katatrepsis

7. Tissue and Organ Development

7.1. Appendages

7.2. Integument and Ectodermal Derivatives

7.3. Central Nervous System

7.4. Gut and Derivatives

7.5. Circulatory System, Muscle, and Fat Body

7.6. Reproductive System

8. Special Forms of Embryonic Development

8.1. Parthenogenesis

8.2. Polyembryony

8.3. Viviparity

8.4. Paedogenesis

9. Factors Affecting Embryonic Development

10. Hatching

Chapter 13. Postembryonic Development

1. Introduction

2. Growth

2.1. Physical Aspects

2.2. Biochemical Changes during Growth

3. Forms of Development

3.1. Ametabolous Development

3.2. Hemimetabolous Development

3.3. Holometabolous Development

3.3.1. The Larval Stage

3.3.2. Heteromorphosis

3.3.3. The Pupal Stage

4. Histological Changes During Metamorphosis

4.1. Exopterygote Metamorphosis

4.2. Endopterygote Metamorphosis

5. Eclosion

6. Control of Development

6.1. Endocrine Regulation of Development

6.2. Factors Initiating and Terminating Molt Cycles

7. Polymorphism



IV. Ecology

Chapter 14. The Abiotic Environment

1. Introduction

2. Temperature

2.1. Effect on Development Rate

2.2. Effect on Activity and Dispersal

2.3. Temperature-Synchronized Development and Emergence

2.4. Survival at Extreme Temperatures

3. Light

3.1. Daily Influences of Photoperiod

3.1.1. Circadian Rhythms

3.2. Seasonal Influences of Photoperiod

3.2.1. Nature and Rate of Development

3.2.2. Reproductive Ability and Capacity

3.2.3. Diapause

4. Water


4.1. Terrestrial Insects

4.2. Aquatic Insects

5. Weather

5.1. Weather and Insect Abundance

5.2. Migration

5.2.1. Categories of Migration

Chapter 15. The Biotic Environment

1. Introduction

2. Food and Trophic Relationships

2.1. Quantitative Aspects

2.2. Qualitative Aspects

3. Insect-Plant Interactions

3.1. Herbivores

3.2. Insect-Plant Mutualism

3.3. Detritivores

4. Interactions between Insects and Other Animals

4.1. Intraspecific Interactions

4.2. Interspecific Interactions

4.2.1. Competition and Coexistence

4.2.2. Predator-Prey Relationships

4.2.3. Insect-Insect Mutualisms

5. Insect Diseases

5.1. Epizootics

5.2. Types of Pathogens

Chapter 16.

Methods in Entomology: Collecting, Preservation,

Curation, and Identification

1. Collection

2. Preservation and curation

3. Identification

4. The common orders

74. General Hydrobiology

1. Course number: BIO3429

2. Credit: 3

3. Prerequisites: Invertebrate (BIO3404).

4. Teaching languague: English

5. Instructors



Full name

Academic title

Degree

Academic units and faculties

Nguyen Xuan Quynh

Assoc. Prof

Ph.D

Faculty of Biology, VNU University of Science

Nguyen Quang Huy




Ph.D

Faculty of Biology, VNU University of Science

Nguyen Thanh Sơn




Ph.D student

Faculty of Biology, VNU University of Science

6. Course objectives

6.1. Knowledge



    • To remember and understand history and development of hydrobiology in the world and Vietnam. Practise methods and techniques in hydrobiology.

    • To remember and understand physiochemical characteristics of aquatic environment and divisions of water bodies.

    • To understand aquatic life at the levels of spcies, population and community.

    • To remember and understand distribution of aquatic organisms in waters and hydrosphere.

    • To analyze and make assessments of aquatic productivity and issues of adequate exploitation, protection and enhancing of aquatic productivity.

    • To analyze and make assessments of exploitation and protection of aquatic biological resources.

    • To analyze and make assessments of water pollution, pollution treatment and protection of natural water bodies.

6.2. Skills

    • To be proficient in skills of investigating physiochemical and biological characteristics of water bodies, especially freshwaters.

    • To be proficient in skills of using methods and equipments in hydrobiological studies in the Lab and the field.

6.3 Attitude

    • To strongly aware and understand the position, functions and importance of waters to the nature and man.

    • To improve on natural love and awareness of environmental protection.

7. Assignment and testing:

- Frequency exams.

- A middle-term exam.

- A final exam.

8. Required textbooks:

- Dang Ngoc Thanh. General Hydrobiology, University and Professional School Publishing House, Hanoi, 1974.

- Dang Ngoc Thanh, Fauna of Freshwater Invertebrates of the Northern Vietnam, Science and Technique Publishing House, Hanoi, 1980.

- Dang Ngoc Thanh, Thai Tran Bai and Pham Van Mien, An Identification Key for Invertebrates of the Northern Vietnam, Science and Technique Publishing House, Hanoi, 1980.

9. Course overview

This course provides basice knowledge on hydrobiology. The main topics include physiochemical characteristics of aquatic environment; aquatic lives at the levels of organism, population and community; distributions of aquatic organisms in various water bodies and hydrosphere; aquatic productivity and issues of exploitation and protection for enhancing aquatic productivity; pollutions in natural water bodies.

10. Detailed course description



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