Applications in Design and Simulation of Sustainable Chemical Processes



tải về 3.25 Mb.
Chế độ xem pdf
trang1/7
Chuyển đổi dữ liệu11.01.2022
Kích3.25 Mb.
#180234
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7
Chapter 8 in Applications in Design and Simulation of Sustainable Chemical Processes (2019, Elsevier Science)



APPLICATIONS IN

DESIGN AND

SIMULATION OF

SUSTAINABLE

CHEMICAL PROCESSES

ALEXANDRE C. DIMIAN

COSTIN SORIN BILDEA

ANTON A. KISS




Elsevier

Radarweg 29, PO Box 211, 1000 AE Amsterdam, Netherlands

The Boulevard, Langford Lane, Kidlington, Oxford OX5 1GB, United Kingdom

50 Hampshire Street, 5th Floor, Cambridge, MA 02139, United States

Copyright

Ó 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any

means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or any

information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the

publisher. Details on how to seek permission, further information about the

Publisher

’s permissions policies and our arrangements with organizations such as the

Copyright Clearance Center and the Copyright Licensing Agency, can be found at our

website:


www.elsevier.com/permissions

.

This book and the individual contributions contained in it are protected under



copyright by the Publisher (other than as may be noted herein).

Notices


Knowledge and best practice in this

field are constantly changing. As new research and

experience broaden our understanding, changes in research methods, professional

practices, or medical treatment may become necessary.

Practitioners and researchers must always rely on their own experience and knowledge

in evaluating and using any information, methods, compounds, or experiments

described herein. In using such information or methods they should be mindful of

their own safety and the safety of others, including parties for whom they have a

professional responsibility.

To the fullest extent of the law, neither the Publisher nor the authors, contributors, or

editors, assume any liability for any injury and/or damage to persons or property as a

matter of products liability, negligence or otherwise, or from any use or operation of

any methods, products, instructions, or ideas contained in the material herein.

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

A catalog record for this book is available from the Library of Congress

British Library Cataloguing-in-Publication Data

A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library

ISBN: 978-0-444-63876-2

For information on all Elsevier publications visit our website

at

https://www.elsevier.com/books-and-journals



Publisher: Susan Dennis

Acquisition Editor: Kostas KI Marinakis

Editorial Project Manager: Redding Morse

Production Project Manager: James Selvam

Cover Designer: Miles Hitchen

Typeset by TNQ Technologies




PREFACE

Man’s yesterday may ne’er be like his morrow; Nought may endure

but Mutability.

Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792e1822).

Sustainable Process Technology is the major change that

chemical process industries will undergo in the next years and

over a longer perspective. The strategic goal is an effective

transition from fossil resources, coal, oil, and gas to renewable

raw materials, mainly based on biomass and recycled waste. The

integrated biorefinery becomes the new industrial concept for

manufacturing biofuels, biochemicals, consumer products, food

products for humans and animals and for supplying energy, at

best from local available resources. Biobuilding blocks allow

constructing a complete offer of chemical products in a way that

is comparable or superior to traditional routes starting from

fossil materials. Challenges for research and development of

sustainable technologies emerge, but these are also opportu-

nities for innovation.

The purpose of this book is coaching and training on how to

create conceptual flowsheets for sustainable processes by

employing systematic process design methods and powerful

simulation tools. Boosting the creativity is the final objective and

the added value for the reader. For this reason, the book starts

with a section devoted to key features of the Sustainable Process

Technology and to Process Systems Engineering approach.

Fifteen representative case studies are presented afterward. The

goal is to develop original process flowsheets and not to repro-

duce existing technologies. Accordingly, each case study brings

elements of novelty, inviting the reader to deepen or to extend

the approach to similar applications.

Each project starts from the fundamental knowledge about

chemistry, thermodynamics, and reaction kinetics, considering

the impact on health, safety, and environment as well. A con-

ceptual flowsheet is developed by applying a systemic method-

ology (process synthesis). Several alternatives are generated, from

which the most suitable one is refined by implementing energy

saving, process integration, optimization, and plantwide control.



Computer simulation is employed intensively for data analysis,

investigating the feasibility of alternatives, sizing the equipment,

and performing the energy and economic studies. The results are

the input of a sustainability analysis that supplies the key process

performance in terms of material intensity, energy requirements,

emissions and ecological footprint, and capital and operation

costs. The results may be compared with flowsheets and perfor-

mance indices of industrial licensed processes. In most cases, the

technical solutions proposed in this book are original being the

object of peer-evaluated publications.

Chapter 1 Sustainable process technology presents the bio-

refinery concept and the key building blocks produced from

renewable raw materials, as biomass, oil, proteins, and bio-based

syngas. The most important are methanol and ethanol, which

may be converted to C2 and C3 olefins, which together with the

glycerol and butanol derivatives may cover all the products

available today from C2eC4 petrochemicals. Other important

biobuilding blocks available by the fermentation of sugars, as

lactic acid, 3-hydroxipropanol, succinic acid, sorbitol, adipic

acid, and furandicarboxylic acid, etc., ensure the emergence of

new ecological biochemicals, namely biodegradable polymers.

The chapter presents also the challenges for process design and

simulation raised by biorefineries.

Chapter 2 Process Systems Engineering approach presents

the systematic conceptual process synthesis applied in the book.

This is based on the seminal Hierarchical Approach upgraded by

the authors’ experience. Thus, the ecological issues are intro-

duced early at the Input/Output level. The basic flowsheet

architecture is determined at the level of Reactor/Separations/

Recycles. Here other systemic issues may be analyzed, as Energy

Integration around the reactors, and Plantwide Control strategy.

The development of the separation is driven by a systematic

task-oriented methodology.

Chapter 3 Methanol focuses on methanol as a major commodity

and energy carrier. Today, significant research effort is devoted to

the development of technologies for methanol synthesis by syngas

and CO

2

hydrogenation. The chapter deals with methanol



manufacturing from synthesis gas (obtained from methane, biogas,

coal, or biomass). A new greener alternative process based on car-

bon dioxide hydrogenation is also explored. Despite being a mature

technology, new developments are still emerging because of new

catalysts and to more efficient reactor design.

Chapter 4 Olefins by MTO process deals with the conceptual

design of energy efficient and cost-effective manufacturing of

xiv


PREFACE


olefins from methanol. The innovative solution consists in full

recovery of the energy generated by reaction. Mechanical vapor

compression is employed for upgrading the temperature/

enthalpy profile of the condensing water/hydrocarbon mixture.

The energy released in reactor is used in a combined heat and

power cycle. The olefin separation and purification take place in

a compact scheme of five columns, integrated with the reaction

section for energy saving. Heat pump is implemented for pro-

pylene purification. Operation and capital costs are minimised

because the process may fully cover the energy needs and

employ a minimum number of units.

Chapter 5 Propylene by olefin metathesis investigates viable

solutions for conversion of low-value by-products to high-value

olefins, as the demand for propylene is of increasing interest. The

chapter considers the olefin metathesis, a process which uses

2-butene (a by-product from fluid catalytic cracking unit) as feed-

stock for obtaining more valuable olefins. Several process alterna-

tives are generated and evaluated in a hierarchical approach, with

the goal of determining the process flowsheet which returns the

highest revenue for a fixed flow rate of raw materials.

Chapter 6 Isobutene dimerization deals with a process that

yields a high-octane number olefinic gasoline. Two options are

presented:

Reactor/Separation/Recycle

(RSR)

and


reactive

distillation (RD). These are compared in terms of specific energy

and catalyst requirements. The RSR appears to be more attrac-

tive than the RD process, as it allows both the reactor and the

separation units to operate close to their optimal conditions. The

RD process operates in the overlapping window of process

conditions for reaction and distillation and thus suffers from this

inherent trade-off.

Chapter 7 Castor oil biorefinery converts this valuable

resource in special biodiesel and high-value chemicals. The

central building block is the methyl ricinoleate ester produced

by transesterification with methanol. The technology makes use

of a two-step process based on homogeneous base catalysis,

employing agitated multicompartment reactor. Methyl ricino-

leate ester is converted by pyrolysis to heptaldehyde, which

finds many applications in cosmetics, and

u-amino-undecylenic

acid, a monomer for high-value polyamides. The process in-

volves complex chemistry and species, for which properties

estimation from structure was applied. The flowsheet develop-

ment uses systematic methods and computer simulation, kinetic

modeling of reactors, and thermodynamic assessment of sepa-

rations. Particular attention is given to saving energy aspects.

PREFACE


xv


The manufacturing of commodity biodiesel has a synergetic

effect with the production of high-value biochemicals.

Chapter 8 Bioethanol and biobutanol are bioalcohols pro-

duced by the action of microorganisms and enzymes through the

fermentation of sugars, starches, or cellulose. A key problem in

the production is the energy-intensive downstream processing of

the diluted mixture obtained by fermentation. This chapter

examines the processes for manufacturing bioethanol and bio-

butanol, with emphasis on the separation and purification as the

final costly steps in the process. The optimization of distillation-

based processes is carried out and used as a comparison basis for

more advanced separation processes (dividing-wall column and

heat pumps assisted distillation).

Chapter 9 Biodiesel presents the conceptual design of two

manufacturing processes. Specific technology issues are devel-

oped regarding feed pretreatment, purification, and separation

methods are discussed. The first case study considers biodiesel

manufacturing from rapeseed (canola) oil using heterogeneous

catalysis and two-step transesterification with intermediate

glycerol separation. The simulation uses detailed reaction

kinetics in view of fulfilling the product specifications. A tower-

type reactor and a novel variable-time reactor are compared.

The second process deals with biodiesel from used cooking oil

using homogeneous alkali catalysis. Alternatives for esterification

of free fatty acids with methanol are compared: batch reactor

with homogeneous catalysis and reactive absorption using solid

catalysts, the last bringing substantial advantages. Moreover, a

process-intensification method based on reactive distillation is

applied for transesterification.

Chapter 10 Dimethyl ether (DME) focuses on the simplest

ether, which is a useful precursor to other organic compounds

and a green aerosol propellant. Recently DME has been

considered as candidate for nonconventional cleaner trans-

portation fuels, namely in Scandinavian countries. This chapter

handles conceptual process design issues of a classic reaction/

separation/recycle process based on adiabatic reactor, as well as

of several process intensification alternatives, with a focus on a

novel catalytic distillation process. The key design parameters

are identified and steady state optimization (minimizing the

annual costs) is performed in Aspen Plus. A combined process

(gas-phase reactor and reactive distillation) is also presented as

an option for revamping existing DME processes based on

methanol dehydration.

xvi


PREFACE


Chapter 11 Fuel additives presents several alternatives for

converting glycerol into more valuable products, as glycerol is

obtained in large quantities as a by-product from biodiesel

production. Thus, etherification with isobutene or tert-butanol

leads to glycerol ethers, which can be used as fuel additives.

Moreover, reaction with aldehydes and ketones leads to acetals

and ketalsdoxygenated compounds which, besides improving

the properties of fuels, have applications as surfactants and

disinfectants or in cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries.

Chapter 12 Styrene deals with conceptual design of a process

based on ethylbenzene dehydrogenation in adiabatic type re-

actors. High-performance catalyst is employed. The technology

makes use of superheated steam as inert, requiring a large

amount of energy. An innovative solution is proposed that gives

a spectacular energy saving. The idea is running the water

evaporation for steam generation under vacuum followed by

mechanical vapor compression (MVR) for restoring the pressure.

This change allows installing a feed-effluent-heat-exchanger

(FEHE) in an evaporation/condensation zone that concentrates

57% from energy saving. An efficient network of five FEHE units

diminishes the utility consumption by 70% with respect to the

base case. The economic analysis demonstrates that the cost of

energy required by the reaction section dominates the cost of

separations. Despite the investment in compressor, the MVR

alternative brings a reduction in total annual cost by 30%.

Chapter 13 Acetic acid from methanol develops the concep-

tual design of a sustainable process using rhodium/iridium

catalyst. The emphasis is set on energy efficiency by optimizing

the reactor cooling in relation with the separation system. In the

homogeneous process the separation section consists of three

columns, while the reaction section may cover about 45% from

the heat needed in the separation section. If heterogeneous

catalyst is employed, the separation is reduced to a sequence of

two columns. Moreover, the energy requirements may be

reduced by 75% if heat pump is applied to acetic acid purifica-

tion. The economic analysis allows the estimation of capital and

operation costs, as well as the product price for 20% return on

investment. The case study also shows how to calculate

comprehensive sustainability metrics for process design.

Chapter 14 Acrylic acid from glycerol deals with the con-

ceptual design of a sustainable process, since the renewable raw

material is available in large amounts and at low cost from

biodiesel manufacturing. The chemistry involves two steps:

dehydration of glycerol to acrolein and further oxidation of

PREFACE

xvii



acrolein to acrylic acid. Heteropolyacids and zeolites catalysts

have good performance, but a regeneration method must be

included in the reactor design. The study examines three alter-

natives: bubbling fluidized bed, circulating turbulent fluidized

bed, and circulating fluidized bed. Two alternatives for sepa-

rating the acrylic acideacetic acidewater mixture are developed,

using azeotropic distillation and liquideliquid extraction. The

exothermal reaction gives good options for energy saving by heat

integration. The capital costs are dominated by reactors. The

sustainability analysis indicates that the process is a viable green

alternative to the petrochemical methods.

Chapter 15 Acrylic esters considers the design, plantwide

control, and economic evaluation of several processes for higher

acrylates production, using solid catalysts. Three reaction/

separation/recycle

(RSR)


process

alternatives

for

2-

ethylhexylacrylate are considered. Each employs a fixed bed



reactor with Amberlyst 70 as catalyst and standard separation

equipment. The alternative using distillation as first separation

step has better economic indicators due to better use of the raw

materials, compared to alternatives where a simple flash or a

decanter are used. The reactive distillation (RD) technology al-

lows great reduction of the capital and operating costs. Then, the

production of n-butyl acrylate is addressed. In this case, the low

relative volatility of acrylic acid and n-butyl acrylate clearly fa-

vors RD over conventional RSR processes. Dynamic simulations

show that, in all cases, the control structure can achieve large

throughput changes and copes well with the contamination with

water of both fresh reactants.

Chapter 16 Dimethyl carbonate focuses on an eco-friendly

versatile chemical that is widely employed as a green solvent,

methylation, and carbonylation agent and potentially as a fuel

additive. The chapter describes two processes for dimethyl car-

bonate (DMC) synthesis, which avoid the disadvantages of the

traditional methanol phosgenation route. The direct synthesis

from methanol and carbon dioxide is an environmentally inter-

esting process. Membrane reactors are suggested as a way of

overcoming the equilibrium limitations by continuous removal

of water from reaction product. The same raw materials can be

also used in a more complex route. Thus, DMC is obtained by the

transesterification reaction between propylene carbonate (PC)

and methanol, where operation at an excess of PC avoids the

costly separation of the methanoleDMC azeotrope. The reaction

of the propylene glycol by-product with urea leads to PC

xviii


PREFACE


(recycled) and ammonia (converted to urea by reaction with

carbon dioxide).

Chapter 17 Polyesters explores various configurations of a

reactive distillation (RD) process for polyesters production. RD is

a great process intensification technique that can drastically

enhance the unsaturated polyesters synthesis. Multi-product

simulations were used to find the operational parameters and

transition time for different grades of polyesters made in the

same equipment. The results of the rigorous simulations carried

out in Aspen Custom Modeler reveal that the best setup has the

reactive stripping section as a packed or trayed bubble column

and the reactive rectifying section as a packed column. With

respect to the feed policy, the feeding of monoesters to the RD

column significantly intensifies the polyester process as

compared to an anhydride reactant fed to the column. Further-

more, the product transition time in this configuration is also

significantly reduced as compared to the other configurations.

We are aware that some errors might still be present, despite

all of our efforts in the revision and the valuable support of

Elsevier. We are open to any remarks and critical suggestions and

therefore grateful in advance for feedback from our readers.

The authors acknowledge the contribution to this book of

many colleagues and students from the Universities of Amster-

dam, Delft, Eindhoven, Twente, and Manchester where the au-

thors have spent a large part from their scientific and teaching

activities. We express also our gratitude to the colleagues and

students from the University Politehnica of Bucharest, where

computer simulation is used for decades to teach Chemical

Engineering subjects. The authors express their appreciation to

company AspenTech for making available to academia an

outstanding simulation technology software.

And last but not the least we express our gratitude and love to

our families for their continuous support and understanding.

Alexandre C. Dimian, Costin S. Bildea, Anton A. Kiss

PREFACE

xix



8

BIOETHANOL AND

BIOBUTANOL

CHAPTER OUTLINE

8.1 Introduction

285


8.2 Renewable versus Fossil Raw Materials

287


8.3 Bioethanol

287


8.3.1 Pretreatment 288

8.3.2 Hydrolysis 289

8.3.3 Fermentation 290

8.3.4 Downstream Processing 293

8.4 Biobutanol

303


8.4.1 Butanol Manufacturing 304

8.4.2 Pretreatment Process 306

8.4.3 AcetoneeButanoleEthanol Process 307

8.4.4 AcetoneeButanoleEthanol Recovery 308

8.4.5 Downstream Processing 310

8.4.5.1 Decanter-Distillation Process

313

8.4.5.2 Heat-Integrated Distillation (DWC) Process



316

8.4.5.3 Azeotropic Distillation in a Dividing-wall column

317

8.4.5.4 Hybrid Separation: Distillation



þ Extraction 322

8.4.5.5 Comparison of Distillation-Based Processes

324

8.5 Conclusions



324

List of Notation

325

References



325

8.1 Introduction

The need for sustainable production of fuels and chemicals has

spurred a signi

ficant amount of research to substitute fossil fuel

sources by renewable sources in the chemical industry. To date,

most of the research in biore

fineries focus on the conversion

(e.g., thermochemical, biological, chemical) or pretreatment

aspects, whereas the real cost of biore

fineries remains in the

downstream processing, which can account for up to 60%e80%

Applications in Design and Simulation of Sustainable Chemical Processes.

https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-444-63876-2.00008-5

Copyright

© 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

285



of the total cost of production (

Ramaswamy et al., 2013; Kiss et al.,

2016

). Biore


fineries can become viable and sustainable only by

using more intensi

fied separations that allow the low-cost and

high-volume production of biofuels.

Nowadays, biofuels are considered a renewable alternative to

fossil fuels. But, unlike fossil fuels, biofuels are produced from

biomass or biowaste, by various processes employed in bio-

re

fineries (



Ramaswamy et al., 2013; Ravindra and Sarbatly,

2015


). To make them competitive against fossil fuels, process

intensi


fication methods are used in the production processes

and especially in the downstream processing (

Kiss, 2013; Dimian

et al., 2014

). These hot topics of research are reported in a number

of books, review papers, and scienti

fic articles.

Biomassdthe nature’s way of storing solar energydis a

generic term meaning any source of organic carbon that is

renewed rapidly as part of the carbon cycle, e.g., not only plant

materials but also animal materials. The

first-generation biofuels

are made from sugars and vegetable oils found in arable crops,

which can be rather easily extracted. The second-generation

biofuels are made from lignocellulosic biomass or woody crops,

agricultural residues, or waste, from which it is harder to extract

the fuel. A series of physical and chemical treatments are required

to convert lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels. The main types of

biofuels produced from various biomass include (

Kiss and Bildea,

2018

) biodiesel (fatty acid alkyl esters), green diesel (hydro-



cracked biological oil), straight vegetable oil (unmodi

fied edible

vegetable oil), bioalcohols (ethanol and butanol), bioethers

(DME, MTBE, ETBE, TAME), pyrolysis oil (biocrude or bio-oil),

biogas (methane obtained by anaerobic digestion), syngas

(mixture of CO and H

2

), and solid biofuels (e.g., wood, sawdust,



grass, charcoal, agricultural waste, nonfood energy crops, and

dried manure).

This chapter focuses only on bioalcohols (bioethanol and bio-

butanol) produced by the action of microorganisms and enzymes

through the fermentation of sugars, starches, or cellulose. Meth-

anol can be also obtained from biomass feedstock, but via the

syngas platform or by CO

2

hydrogenation (as discussed in Chap-



ter 3). It is worth noting that in case of fermentative processes, the

diluted mixture obtained must undergo energy-intensive down-

stream processing employing signi

ficant costs (

Straathof, 2011

).

Process intensi



fication technologies can be used to intensify the

production and downstream processing of bioalcohols, e.g.,

dividing-wall column (DWC) or heat pumpeassisted (extractive

or azeotropic) distillation (

Kiss, 2013

).

286



Chapter 8 BIOETHANOL AND BIOBUTANOL


8.2 Renewable versus Fossil Raw Materials

Fossil fuelebased raw materials ensure 80% of the energy supply

nowadays, while the renewable resources just 15% (

Keim, 2014

).

However, the availability of fossil raw materials is expected to



decline in the near future because of the increase of energy

used by industrialized countries and the rapid growth of world

population. To overcome such problems, alternatives resources

of energy are needed, as well as energy conservation. In addition,

the concern about the environmental negative impact as global

warming, caused by burning of fossil fuels with high CO

2

emis-


sions, increases the interest in using biofuels.

Alcohols have been used as a fuel for a long time, as they have

characteristics that allow them to be used in internal combustion

engines. The short-chain alcohols (C1eC4) remain of major inter-

est because they can be synthesized chemically or biologically.

Methanol is mostly produced from natural gas, but it can be

also synthesized from biomass via syngas platform. Ethanol is

usually produced from biological feedstock through fermentation

processes, while biobutanol is still more dif

ficult to produce as

compared with ethanol or methanol. When produced from bio-

logical materials/processes, they are known as bioalcohols, but

actually there is no chemical difference between the biologically-

and chemically produced alcohols.

8.3 Bioethanol

Bioethanol is the most promising renewable fuel, with a key

advantage over other alternatives, namely that it can be directly

integrated in existing fuel systems without any modi

fication of

the current engines (typically as a 5%e85% mixture with gaso-

line). The production of bioethanol relies on various routes:

corn to ethanol, sugarcane to ethanol, basic and integrated

lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. In all cases, the raw materials

undergo several pretreatment steps that aim to break the feed-

stock into sugars, which then enter the fermentation stage

where bioethanol is actually produced. A common feature of

these technologies is the production of diluted bioethanol (typi-

cally in the range of 5e12%wt ethanol) that needs to be further

concentrated to reach the requirements of the international bio-

ethanol standards. Depending on the standard requirements,

the maximum water content in ethanol is 0.2 %vol (EN 15,376,

EU), 0.4 %vol (ANP no. 36/2005, BR), or 1.0 %vol (ASTM D

4806, USA).

Chapter 8 BIOETHANOL AND BIOBUTANOL

287



Fig. 8.1

illustrates the technological scheme of the production

process (

Kiss and Ignat, 2012

). To reach the purity targets, an

energy-demanding separation is needed in practice, to overcome

the presence of the binary azeotrope ethanolewater (95.63%wt

ethanol). The separation is typically carried out by distillation,

the

first step being a preconcentration distillation column (PDC)



that increases the ethanol content from 5% to 12% up to

91e94%wt (

Kiss and Ignat, 2013

). The second step consists of

the ethanol dehydration, up to concentrations exceeding the

azeotropic composition.

8.3.1 Pretreatment

Along the downstream processing, the pretreatment process is a

major cost in the overall process for bioethanol production. The

pretreatment process has signi

ficant effects on all downstream

processes and ultimately in

fluences the overall biofuel yield

and cost (

Vohra et al., 2014

). Pretreatment ensures that carbohy-

drates are extracted or made accessible to further extraction.


tải về 3.25 Mb.

Chia sẻ với bạn bè của bạn:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7




Cơ sở dữ liệu được bảo vệ bởi bản quyền ©tieuluan.info 2022
được sử dụng cho việc quản lý

    Quê hương